zaterdag 4 april 2015

An introduction into the use of Zanpar dough ger sticks,by compiled and apprehended by Madrason 05042015

An introduction into the use of Zanpar dough/ger sticks: compiled and apprehended by Madrason 05042015 photo credits mostly from the expert Robert Brundage ( not to be copied without his permission/ on this site only for non commercial educational use as stated in my Header)

This is a Tibetan monastic piece, usually called a "dough mold" in English. It used to produce flour effigies used in various rituals. This is a particularly large one - sometimes the molds existed in sets of smaller boards tied into a bundle but this larger example was likely comprehensive enough to stand on its own.
Dough molds were used in Tibetan popular rituals to make dough effigies called zan par ("dough print"). The ritual is a form of protection, exorcism, or ransom.
The moulds would be carried from a monastery by a trained monk to the home of anyone who wished cure sickness or to deal with various misfortunes. The practitioner could chose from the dozens of small inscriptions on the board to identify the type of obstacle to be dealt with, be it human, animal, bird, supernatural, or symbolic. This accounts for the great number of carved images found on a single board. He then places a ball of dough (tsampa (dried Ger) flour and water) onto the appropriate incised images, presses it to form an images of the objects and then places them on an offering plate located on a specially constructed altar. Chants by the practitioner expedite the transfer whatever impediments he discovered into the dough effigies.
This dough mold is 13-1/4 inches long. It is carved on all four sides and measures 2-3/4 by 1-1/2 inches around. As can be seen in the photographs it has darkened with age and has a very pleasant patina.
The carving is extremely confident and carefully done. It is very difficult to estimate the age of a timeless artifact such as this but we would confidently estimate it to be well over a century old.
Zanpar, zanpai ....houten stok met symbolen, doet aan koekenplankjes denken! Tibettaans; werd door bonpriesters gebruikt bij zegeningen en helingsrituelen, bij de ziekte of kwaal werd er een symbool in verharde ger gedrukt en meegegeven aan de klant!Het werden dan kleine amuletjes, of ze gegeten moesten worden dat weet ik niet, ik denk van wel! M










http://www.astamangala.com/douhg-mould-zanpar/ old zanpar, with a variety of groups: deities, animals, torma-offerings, symbols as the Astamangala, etc.
The dough-forms were/are used during offering-rituals. They were NOT, as described in several studies, used as substitutes of the original pre-buddhist animal- or human-offerings. 
litt:
Zara Fleming,“The Ritual Significance of Zan par”, in: Proceedings of the 10th Seminar of the IATS, Vol. 13: Art in Tibet, Leiden 2003, p. 161-168.
Wooden Mould Sticks (Zanpar)
Information on Wooden Mould Sticks
Robert BRUNDAGE describes these objects in the following way: “Carvings of myriad ritual implements, animals, deities and demons are skillfully rendered in miniature.… Intricately carved images of esoteric ritual objects, demonic spirits and Buddhist protectors were carved into wooden sticks called Zanpar (zan-spar). Tsampa (barley meal and yak butter dough) was pressed into the appropriate images to produce ritual sacrificial offerings (T. glud) for good fortune and protection from malevolent spirits that often create disorder.”
Reference: Robert Brundage  (http://www.artyeti.com/)

Paul MORSE on wooden mould sticks: “Dough molds were used in Tibetan popular rituals to make dough effigies … The ritual is a form of protection, exorcism, or ransom. The molds would be carried from a monastery by a trained monk to the home of anyone who wished to cure sickness or to deal with various misfortunes. The practitioner could chose from the dozens of small inscriptions on the board to identify the type of obstacle to be dealt with, be it human, animal, bird, supernatural, or symbolic. This accounts for the great number of carved images found on a single board. He then places a ball of dough (tsampa flour and water) onto the appropriate incised images, presses it to form an images of the objects and then places them on an offering plate located on a specially constructed altar. Chants by the practitioner expedite the transfer whatever impediments he discovered into the dough effigies.”
Reference: Paul Morse (http://www.trocadero.com/pmorse/)

The older ones seem to have a more varying  wooden mould/form almost alike printing blocks!
They might have derived from symbolic amulet writings or tattoos used for curing the ill. M



        And now the excerpt of a professional approach in a magazine ;




                The plates are not in this article! M

(Pages do not follow u because of not shown plates of zanpars)

Thanks for reading and please do share your knowledge with us! etnoconverse@gmail.com
Trivial Art Tribal Art = TA-TA

maandag 16 februari 2015

Ivory Coast art, Rietvelds "Masters of African Art"; a crtitique by Madrason

About the exposition of African Masters in De Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam;

I have enjoyed myself at the Nieuwe Kerk in Amsterdam and visited this exposition with joy. Yet did I miss the information that should be mentioned, the use of the objects, and of course it's creators. The good thing is that the creators were now sometimes named. As Franz Boas would have said , to deprimitivise the object without forgetting it's context, and to constitute a platform of autobiographies in and of African tribal (world) arts!
However the risks of commercialising yet again and to exclude the normal collector without no big names, from this enigmatic part of the worlds art in general. Not only for African art should there be a parallel lapse and fusion of autobiographies and the contextual uses of the Signed arts. But being significant shouldn't simply mean signed or ascribed to!! Obrechts also made a great effort in contributing to the author of the so called Primitive art. Let ś not beat around the bush and forget the whole concept of primitive from this moment on, please!
The thing I missed in Hombergers travelling exposition were the names Boas and Olbrechts.
The art made by the artist mentioned in the exposition, working with a chain saw , broke my heart, it is again another exhibionistic way of shamefully abusing a guy, who didn't have much more than a few insignificant words to add to his work, autographed in sito!
One cannot develop without history as a base. I do miss perspectives on a sound base. Why make such simple names as master of the round forms, big hands, big breasts, soon one is running out of names and I find it a kind of primitive language and offensive to the good intended goal; more significance to an art that hitherto was to often called primitive, we are passed that chapter now I hope?

Madrason at TrivialArtTribalArt dd 15 feb 2015 Bois le Duc
for Trivial Art Tribal Art = TA-TA

Books, Leo Frobenius:
https://ia601701.us.archive.org/5/items/ChildhoodOfMan/ChildhoodOfMan_Froebenius_520pgsFO.pdf
Childhood of Man.
Sites;
Franz Boas: https://www.google.nl/?gws_rd=ssl#q=primitive+art+boas.pdfhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Boas
Olbrechts; http://www.olbrechtsgenootschap.be/wie.html
Leo Frobenius: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Frobenius
http://www.rietberg.ch/de-ch/ausstellungen/archiv/afrikanische-meister.aspx





















donderdag 23 oktober 2014

Ethnopoetry or Natural prose;a small contribution by Madrason

Ethnopoetry or Natural prose;

ABSTRACT/RESUME
Poetry has been largely overlooked in the research on traditional
Native litera- ture. The author reviews and categorizes the
traditional poetry of North American Indians. This poetry was
oral, usually presented as song, but good translation and the
transfer to a written form can still preserve the flavour of
the cultures in which it developed.
Traditional Native literature consists of two major categories:
mythology and poetry. A great deal of research has gone into the
collecting, categorizing and analysing of myths and legends but
poetry has received relatively little attention.

Myths and legends were used to teach sacred truths or to pass on
historical information. Origin myths dealt with the transition
from a mythical to a modern age; essentially the myths tell how
the earth was created and how living things came to benefit from
the phenomena of nature. The plots of the stories that have been
developed in human society reflect the cultural settings,
occupations and interests of the people and are usually called
legends. Most widespread and popular, however, are the stories
told about the "trickster". He is an inchoate being who wanders
from place to place; he violates human values at will though
he does not appear to be intentionally good or evil. It is through
him that all values come into being (Radin, 1972:xxiii). The
"trickster" straddles both myths and legends and is found, not
only in ancient tales of all hunting societies,
but in many contemporary Native societies as well. He can,
perhaps, be viewed as a psychological phenomena, an attempt to
understand human nature. Carl Jung saw him as the personification
of those traits of character which are sometimes better and
sometimes worse than the normal human being (Radin, 1972:
195).
In that she is right, lies the foundation of this article, to
bring tribal poetry closer to a larger public. One thing we all
seem to know or have read something about;
The way Sitting Bull and Geronimo addressed the dirty agenda and
contracts the States tried to pull through their noses as if they
were ignorants!

The metaphors they used as a reply were of a grandeur only life in
nature could present. If I give you many dollars would you sell
your lands, said a governor who started a negotiation in
resettlement! The reply of a certain chief was, after a long
discourse about the treasures of nature and stealing from Wakan or
from Great Manitou;
If the governor is willing to pay a silver- dollar for each grain
of desert- sand in my hand, then we have a deal! M

http://www3.brandonu.ca/library/cjns/5.1/grant.pdf





















                      A small contribution to ethnopoetics, by Madrason


 Literature:

1. C.M.Bowra “Primitive Song”
2. African Poetry by Ulli Beier Oxford
3. Dichtungen der Naturvolker Eckart von Sydow 1925 Phaidon
4. Tirade:213 “Luister hoort toch Marupu”
5. Les Baoules, Dictions et Proverbes, CEDA
6. Lyriek der Natuurvolken, Hella S Haasse & W. Muensterberger
7. De donkere Lier door W A Braasem & Ed Hoornik
8. The Masks of the Gods, Joseph Campbell
9. Alcheringa magazines , as quoted and illustrated.
10.Bluenotes, by Madrason.
11. This article downloadable on gdrive: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7crRLaefXfrYkpZWFVnSWxVV1JaYS00VmpTTXNhVzZrdGFr/view?usp=sharing

The Tsjurunga or Churinga Docs:Part 3 dreamtime, offered concept by Madrason

The Tsjurunga or Churinga Docs:Part 3 dreamtime, offered concept by Madrason

Dreamtime 1

Along with a host of others, you've left the camp, leaving behind the women and the uninitiated and all vestiges of the mundane, your spears and carrying bags, and your social names. You're on a solemn journey to your birth place. Single file, without a sound, you and the others walk in awe. Although it's not far into the desert, few ever visit without invitation.
Your group has arrived, and all immediately begin to clear the ground of the debris and stones that have accumulated since last you were here. The area of some twenty paces is laid smooth. Several go to a nearby rock outcropping and, from the cache, bring out with great care the churinga boards. Some are as long as an arm, most much shorter, all of wood, each richly carved with the signs of the clan ancestors and of their adventures. Sitting in a circle on the cleared earth, the churingas are passed to each of your group in turn. Each holds the oval-shaped boards close, rubbing them against himself.
* * * * *
Ground Painting
of the Wallunqua (Snake) Totem
(Warramunga Tribe, 2 meters long)








The following illustrations are the reverse sides of a churinga board. The board is from the Aranda (an Australian Aborigine people) and represents the Frog spirit, an expression of the Alcheringa. The wood carving is 39 centimeters in length. On the churinga, the three prominent sets of concentric circles are the celebrated gum-tree at the sacred site near Hugh River. It is out of these
trees that the frog comes forth. On the first side (top), the double concentric circles are the bodies of small frogs having just emerged from the trees. The lines connecting them are their limbs. On the reverse side (bottom), the three gum-trees are again seen. The series of lines extending from them are their roots. The smaller concentric circles are less important gum-trees with their roots.The dots are the tracks of the frogs as they hop about in the sand of the river bed.

alcheringa [Arunta of Australia, alcheringa], n. 1. The Eternal Dream Time, The Dreaming of a sacred heroic time long ago when man and nature came to be, a kind of narrative of things that once happened. 2. A kind of charter of things that still happen. 3. A kind of logos or principle of order transcending everything significant. v. 1. The act of dreaming, as reality and symbol, by which the artist is inspired to produce a new song. 2. The act by which the mind makes contact with whatever mystery it is that connects the Dreaming and the Here-and-Now.

Tips; Spencer and Gillen:

https://archive.org/details/nativetribescen02gillgoog